NFC Tag and QR Code

When I explained NFC tag to a friend, he replied, “I got it! It’s like QR code.” Spot-on. The concept is similar to QR code. QR code is popular enough for people to capture the concept. For those who aren’t sure what a QR code is, here is an example:Wikipedia_mobile_en

QR (Quick Response) code was created by a Toyota subsidiary in 1994 to track vehicles during manufacture. It became widely utilized worldwide in the last few years with the popularization of smart phones, which can be used as QR code scanners. For example: Front Flip is a mobile app that can be downloaded to an iPhone or Android phone to scan QR codes. Some restaurants place their QR code by the entrance of their stores. When customers scan it with Front Flip in their phones, they unlock a digital scratch-off card that provides a chance to win a discounted meal. This helps retaining customers. More than 30 such mobile loyalty apps have emerged in recent months [1].

The main difference between a QR code and an NFC tag is that NFC tags can be read by smart phones without an app. Today, most newly released smart phones are NFC enabled; they have an NFC chip inside the phone that communicates with NFC tags.

For example: Starbucks can embed an NFC tag in a poster promoting a new drink. When a customer taps his/her NFC phone to the tag, he/she gets a coupon for a discount. The customer can pass that coupon just by tapping his/her phone with a friend’s NFC phone. These are how NFC functions in open mode.

Cost-wise, the NFC tag is still much more expensive (around a dollar more) than QR code (which only costs pennies). The cost for NFC tags will drop as it becomes more widely adopted over time. Phone manufactures, telecoms, and service providers should educate their consumers about NFC devices in order to speed up the adoption rate.

ABI Research reported 102 million NFC handsets were shipped in 2012; 285M will ship in 2013 and 500M in 2014. NFC tablets and laptops have already been released. Sometimes, I wonder why telecoms can’t figure out how to promote NFC capability to their consumers when it’s so easy to demonstrate the advantage of using it and so many devices are available with the capability.

[1] http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323689204578569382612115700.html?KEYWORDS=QR+code

2 thoughts on “NFC Tag and QR Code

  1. QR codes are free actually. My company, SocialTagg, makes a free business card replacement app that uses QR codes to exchange contact info. Check it out!

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